• George Morris

15 Films To Make You Feel Better in These Troubled Times

I’m not even going to attempt to sugar coat it. The times they are-a changin’ and boy…they changin’ bad. Global catastrophes, murderous injustice, racial profiling, a world-erupting pandemic, national tensions rising, civil unrest and financial disparity are just some of the things our daily glance at the news provides us. In these troubled times it’s normal to search out entertainment that not only keep our minds busy but make us feel good…and gosh darn it if films don’t take up a big chunk of that entertainment.

So if you’re at home with a few hours to kill, desperate to escape the atrocities of the outside world and wish to prevent them from damaging your mental health I’d like to offer a small list of some life-affirming movies to leave you with a profound sense of oneness and (maybe even) happiness.

IMPORTANT: Please bear in mind that whilst it’s natural to seek respite from such hateful events going on, ignoring them isn’t the answer. By staying informed and standing up for causes you believe to be just, you can help put a stop to many of these terrible, terrible ordeals. There’ll be some links at the end of this post as usual if you wish to know more.

Now, I’m going to try and steer (mostly) clear of many film’s you’d usually see on lists like these. We all know how charming and rose-tinted the Paddington movies are – that’s common knowledge by now. Instead, I’m going to try and offer some more off-cut suggestions. Genre pieces, indie comedy-dramas, y’know, that whole spiel. Though the films aren’t in any order of quality, I’ll be ranking them through a series of completely biased and trivial categories depending on the ins and outs of the narrative. [Also, this is all my opinion. I’m more inclined to sad stories personally so some of these may dwell on the more downbeat aspects of a story before offering up a wholesome life lesson, but I’ll detail those in the roundups.]

Whether it’s comfort in the form of euphoric positivity or the warm blanket of familiarity, I hope these films will give you that feeling of innermost satisfaction.

So without further ado…

Hearts Beat Loud (2018)



Written by Brett Haley & Marc Basch

Directed by Brett Haley

One of the more quaint offerings within this list, Hearts Beat Loud follows self-renowned ‘cool dad who owns a record store’ Frank Fisher (Nick Offerman in full-charm mode) as he records a jam session with his daughter Sam (Kiersey Clemons) and sticks the resulting song up on Spotify. After it becomes a small hit, the two are drawn towards their fleeting idea of stardom during the summer before Sam leaves for university. It’s about as comfy as a pair of thermal socks. The narrative is hardly original and doesn’t need to be, as long as the central relationship between single-father and daughter works, and it does. Offerman’s laid-back leading man performance allows Clemons to rise to the occasion and cleverly bypass many of the pratfalls from such a dynamic. There’s no angsty lashing out or misunderstanding, just two people who love and accept each other for who they are (whilst occasionally getting mad at one another). Hop on board for the catchy tunes, stay for the wholesome central duo.

Narrative Drama – 2/5

Originality – 2/5

Life Lessons – 3/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 1/5

Final Verdict: Makes you wish you lived next door to a father/daughter record store and could spend every waking hour listening to them craft pop-infused love ballads and feeling the warmth from it.

Real Steel (2011)



Written by John Gatins

Directed by Shawn Levy

There’s a comfort in the underdog story. Whether it’s a classic like Rocky or not, if a film hits the right beats it can have you eating out the palm of its hands. It’s a formula because it works more often than not, and Real Steel even manages to copy Rocky almost verbatim for a large chunk of its runtime. Originally pitched as the big-screen adaptation of ‘Rock’em Sock’em Robots’, this entire film is just the Italian Stallion…but with robots instead of humans in the ring. Hugh Jackman’s Charlie Kenton is a washed-up father to a son he doesn’t have a relationship with (Dakota Goyo’s Max) and thus they bond over working together to make it as professional robot fighters in this futuristic society *cough* set in 2020 *cough*. It’s a bit like that episode of The Simpsons where Homer pretends to be a robot so Bart can compete in Robot Wars and…wait a minute. It’s exactly like that! Real Steel manages to do just enough characterisation amidst its cliché moments to genuinely capture that punch-the-air excitement from the best of its genre. It’s an unexpected small delight and you could do a lot worse with two hours…

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 0/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: Makes you want to take your dad up on his offer from years ago where he expressed interest in making a soapbox racing car for the derby, just so you could have that one special project with them.

The Peanut Butter Falcon (2019)



Written & Directed by Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz

The most recent film on this list, The Peanut Butter Falcon’s name manages to capture its feel-good nature. Zack Gottsagen plays Zak, a young boy with Down Syndrome who runs away from the facility he lives in only to develop a quick bond with a fisherman trying to escape the law (Shia LaBeouf). So far, it sounds an awful lot like Mud starring Matthew McConaughey (another good choice for this list), but instead Peanut Butter Falcon focuses on Zack’s dreams of becoming a wrestler. As the two head to a wrestling school in Florida they’re followed by Zack’s carer Eleanor (Dakota Johnson) who intends to bring him back to the facility. The whole thing feels like a moral fable drenched in the heat of the North Carolina sun, free from the shackles of its fairly-predictable narrative because it elevates the central trio of characters to the point where they all make conscious decisions based on what they want rather than what they need to do. It’s a nice reminder of the unexpected goodness in people and the lengths in which some may go in order to help.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 2/5

Life Lessons – 3/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: Now I’ve never read Huckleberry Finn, but I imagine that this encapsulates the feeling of that tale without any of the associated nastiness of the times.

The Breakfast Club (1985)


Written & Directed by John Hughes

Okay I said I’d try to steer clear of some of the more obvious offerings, but The Breakfast Club is an institution and there’s a reason for that. A rallying cry and required viewing for teenagers and troubled kids anywhere who feel as though they don’t ‘fit in’ with the rest of the crowd. Judd Nelson, Emilio Estevez, Molly Ringwald, Ally Sheedy and Anthony Michael Hall are archetypes, sure, but the narrative plays with the caveats of those ideologies in a way that feels timeless. As five strangers brought together for detention on a Saturday, these kids develop a bond that can’t be planned. They break down the natural barriers between them and talk about their problems and insecurities in a way that feels natural as well as enlightening. Though your personal preference on its profound nature may vary depending on your tolerance for 80s nostalgia and the confessional formula it relies on. These minute epiphanies can seem like boulder-sized weights lifted off the shoulders of others and it’s a testament to the understanding of the unseen problems those around you have. Who knows? You might just get a newfound adoration of those around you…

I’ll always be a little bit sore over Allison having to change who she is as a person for the story to work, however.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 3/5

Life Lessons – 4/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: One of those emotional reactions you’ll want to recreate in your own life as much as possible. It’s too bad your life won’t have as good a soundtrack.

Galaxy Quest (1999)


Written by David Howard & Robert Gordon

Directed by Dean Parisot

The best Star Trek film? It still could be… It might seem odd to think of sci-fi comedy Galaxy Quest, about a bunch of actors from a defunct cult television series becoming mixed up in an actual intergalactic conflict, as anything remotely life-affirming but it’s one of those films that’s so good-natured and genuinely funny that it manages to transcend simply appealing to the nerd demographic. Tim Allen, Sigourney Weaver, Alan Rickman and Sam Rockwell are all on top form at all times. Whether it’s bickering over their screen-time on the TV show or attempting not to freak out in the presence of an alien race so passive and feeble they probably consider a spoon a deadly weapon. There’s an underlying sense of passion and respect for the Star Trek mythos that’s difficult to argue with, and even when it pokes fun at its fans and conventions it never feels malicious or cruel. Instead, it rewards such devotion and creativity for keeping the spirit of the show alive. It’s not only a story of the actors finally learning to be the heroes they were known for playing, but also a supportive applause for the undying love of genre fans everywhere that keeps those stories playing forever.

It’s also just really fucking funny you guys.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 4/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: Makes you feel as if one day the SS Enterprise will genuinely signal you for help in saving the galaxy. And there’s nothing cooler than that.

Safety Not Guaranteed (2012)


Written by Derek Connolly

Directed by Colin Trevorrow

Before taking on the Jurassic World franchise, duo Connolly and Trevorrow lit up the scene with this indie gem. It’s difficult to go wrong with an independent romantic coming-of-age drama. At the same time however, it’s incredibly hard to make one that lasts and ages well. Safety Not Guaranteed might have stuck the landing by leaning into its light science fiction premise. Aubrey Plaza’s magazine intern Darius is sent to investigate a suspicious add in a local newspaper detailing help needed for a man who claims to be able to travel through time (Mark Duplass’ Kenneth). Joined by her boss Jeff (Jake Johnson) and his assistant Amau (Karan Soni), they soon discover that whilst Kenneth may be a bit outlandish and quirky…he might not be so insane after all. Duplass’ everyman rigidity bounces off Plaza’s distinctive deadpan exterior perfectly and allows the dup of Johnson and Soni to pick up any moments of slack. It’s a film that’s remarkably easy-going and doesn’t ask for anything in return, except for the possibility to charm your socks off.

Narrative Drama – 2/5

Originality – 3/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: Will have you scouring your local newspaper looking for your next adventure (just be careful, remember not to trust strangers and stay safe out there gang).

Before Sunrise (1995)


Written & Directed by Richard Linklater

Let the record show I’ve deliberately only put the first instalment of the greatest romance trilogy of all time on this list, and that’s because I personally believe the first meeting of Ethan Hawke’s Jessie and Julie Delpy’s Celine as about as perfect as can be. Two twenty-something strangers strike up a conversation whilst on a train to Vienna and decide to spontaneously spend the evening together walking, talking and exploring in order to take advantage of their situation. That’s it. That’s all you need to know. There’s a problem, however. Not only will you fall in love with them as much as they do with each other, but it’ll ignite your own long-lasting longing for the same experience. One without technology or planning. A time to be swept up off your feet and astounded by an instantaneous connection. I firmly believe this film to have ruined the idea of romance for me, but I can’t make it stop me from believing that such perfection is possible. Whenever I watch it I don’t want their time together to end.

It should also be said that depending on who you talk to, the sequel (set and released nine years later) Before Sunset is also a great alternative. Just beware, for the third instalment Before Midnight offers a harsh reminder of reality that, whilst strengthening Jessie and Celine’s story, also proves that such perfection can sometimes only be a projection.

Narrative Drama – 2/5

Originality – 3/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: Note to self, go to Vienna and find the love of my life. Then I won’t stop smiling.

Meet the Robinsons (2006)


Written by Jon A. Bernstein, Michaelle Spritz, Don Hall, Nathan Greno, Aurion Redson, Joe Mateo and Stephen Anderson

Directed by Stephen Anderson

Look at the amount of credited writers this underrated Disney gem has. That’s insane, though not necessarily hard to believe. Meet the Robinsons tells the tale of young Lewis, an orphan science prodigy who is taken to the future by his new mysterious friend Wilbur Robinson. Lewis meets Wilbur’s eclectic extended family (think The Addams Family but colourful and with more gadgets)

complete with a self-conscious T-Rex and a talking frog house band. Its lightning-fast and quip-fuelled dialogue keeps things speeding along, but it’s the emotional depth that hides within Meet the Robinsons that makes it something rather special. Lewis and his best friend/fellow orphan Goob are constantly reminded of the families they don’t have, and whilst the film never wallows in the sadness of this fact it instead weaponizes it in order to remind us that the real families we get to choose. Whether that’s in the traditional sense or the friends we surround ourselves with, and if you keep looking forward you can always find something to keep that hope alive.

I really don’t understand why this film isn’t a bigger deal.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 3/5

Life Lessons – 5/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: No dad, I’m not crying at a film where a T-Rex becomes self-conscious about the small size of its arms. YOU ARE!

Pride (2014)



Written by Stephen Beresford

Directed by Matthew Warchus

Real-life stories can often be the most impactful, and the ‘Lesbians and Gays support the Miners’ campaign in Britain after the miners’ strike in 1984 offers up the perfect platform for that classic British charm we’re known for (which we’re sorely missing, currently). Imelda Staunton, Bill Nighy, Paddy Considine and Andrew Scott are all blisteringly off-kilter in a film that never veers to far into the wrong side of sentimentality either. Whilst it doesn’t skirt around conflicting opinions and prejudices against the LGBT community within England at the time, it instead offers entry examples of hostility that actually bolster the character’s political action further. It never forgets the power of positivity, and whilst it could be argued that it somewhat trivialises some aspects of the events it depicts, it’s difficult to argue with such overwhelming charm and unity in a time where it was practically unheard of.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 2/5

Life Lessons – 4/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 3/5

Final Verdict: Deserves to be in your collection between the likes of other feel-good British classics like Billy Elliot, The Full Monty and Made in Dagenham.

Big Fish (2003)


Written by John August

Directed by Tim Burton

Perhaps Tim Burton’s most underrated work, Big Fish is a story about stories. In particular, those tall tales passed down from generation from generation. Edward Bloom (Albert Finney/Ewan McGregor’s) biography isn’t like most - it’s filled with giants, werewolves and witches. But they’re completely overshadowed by the sensationalism that accompanies moments of joy and love. The moments where time stops to signify love at first sight. The lengths you go in order to see someone again. How the hope they bring can get you through the darkest periods of your life (even war). But it’s more than that too, it’s about a willingness to let go of jealousy and learning to accept the whimsy of life. Edward’s son Will (Billy Crudup) is so busy stuck in the ‘real’ world that he’s lost his sense of imagination – something that only the stories told by his father can bring back to him. It’s a wholesome fable in every sense of the word, and one that reminds you the everlasting power of our stories can allow us to live forever in the minds of many.

Narrative Drama – 4/5

Originality – 4/5

Life Lessons – 4/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 4/5

Final verdict: I’m trying to fight off the urge to take up a place on the corner of the street and just tell passers-by stories for the rest of my life. If even one smiles from my crazy tales I’ll know it’s worth it.

The Fundamentals of Caring (2016)


Written & Directed by Rob Burnett

Surprise! It’s another solid entry in the independent, coming-of-age genre. Paul Rudd plays Ben, an out-of-work writer *cough cough* who becomes a registered caregiver to wheelchair-bound Trevor (Craig Roberts) who has muscular dystrophy. Of course, an unlikely bond develops between the two of them and they embark on a cross-country road trip to visit all the garish and tacky roadside attractions that Trevor is obsessed with. Along the way they’re joined by a young pregnant woman whose car has broken down (Megan Ferguson) as well as a rebellious teen looking to start a new life (Selena Gomez). But it turns out everyone has their own baggage, and the trip jumps dozens of emotional hurdles in order to clarify the personal struggles each of them go through, as well as the responsibility of family and friends. I didn’t expect to be so completely won over by this one, but I’m glad it exists in the canon of heartfelt dramas.

Narrative Drama – 2/5

Originality – 1/5

Life Lessons – 3/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: I’m pretty sure it’s law that if a close friend offers you the chance to take an estranged road trip where you can open up to each other, you take it.

Benny & Joon (1993)



Written by Barry Berman & Lesley McNeil

Directed by Jeremiah S. Chechik

Siblings Benny (Aidan Quinn) and Juniper ‘Joon’ Pearl (Mary Stuart Masterson) are as tight knit as can be, but when they accidentally add another roommate in the form of illiterate and quirky physical comedian Sam (Johnny Depp) and Joon falls for him, their routine lifestyle is thrown to the wayside. Benny & Joon tackles the subject of mental health (Joon has schizophrenia, despite it never being said) remarkably well considering the age of this film. Not only does it manage to steer clear from the majority of negative stereotypes, but it refuses to allow her character to be defined by it, instead opting to place all the eggs in the romance basket. It’s easy to see why too. Depp’s mundane surrealist comedy routines win as over as much as it does the siblings to the point where separation anxiety takes hold whenever they aren’t allowed to be together. On the other hand too it treats Quinn’s Benny with a quiet respect away from the ‘carer’ roll that’s forced unto him and encourages him to obtain a life that can adapt around the needs of his sister. Even in its darker moments the promise of help is never far away, and it’s a reassuring and gentle reminder we need every now and then.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 2/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 2/5

Final Verdict: How many physical comedy classes do you reckon it takes to win the person of your dreams? I’m gonna bet seven.

Jeff, Who Lives at Home (2011)


Written & Directed by Jay and Mark Duplass

The Duplass brothers have a knack for ‘mumblecore’ dramas filled with vivid, real characters that we

absorb into our own lifestyle. Jeff, Who Lives at Home is perhaps their least-known and spoken about and, whilst it’s not their best work it still manages to resonate with a timeless, miniscule tale of personal achievement. Jason Segel plays the titular Jeff, a 30-year-old stoner who still lives with his mother (Susan Sarandon) and centres his entire life around the notion of fate. He believes that seemingly random occurrences throughout life will guide him to his true potential, whether that be in getting a job or making a difference in the world. Unfortunately, his uptight brother Pat (Ed Helms) disagrees, though his technique of emotionally closing off when vulnerable has left his marriage to Linda (Judy Greer) in shambles as he discovers she might be cheating on him. Every member of this family is initially standoffish and judgemental of Jeff’s outlook, but it’s the way their stories converge and offer a glimmer of hope even when the randomness of bad luck is in full flow. It’s short piece of work, and noticeably different from the other entries on this list. Once described as a ‘feel sorta good movie’ rather than just feelgood, Jeff, Who Lives at Home’s distinct uptick could offer you the gentle nudge of support you need right now.

Narrative Drama – 3/5

Originality – 2/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 1/5

Final Verdict: A distinctly human story of imperfect individuals struggling to make sense of what’s going on. It’s sometimes mundanely close to home but every now and then you need that familiarity to hit you where you live.

When Harry Met Sally… (1989)


Written by Nora Ephron

Directed by Rob Reiner

You’ve seen When Harry Met Sally…right? Are you kidding me?! You haven’t seen it? What the hell have you been doing with your life? Do you not like loveable films? Go watch it now. I’ll wait… Now. Wasn’t that just perfect? Essentially just a series of ongoing inside-jokes and conversations developing as two close friends Harry (Billy Crystal) and Sally (Meg Ryan) realise they love each other, this pretty much set the bar for all rom coms moving forward. Asking the age-old questions ‘can a man and woman ever just be friends?’ makes it sound so cynical and like it has some sort of agenda, when in actuality the film’s dialogue and structure (thanks to one of the best screenplays of all time from Ephron) make each little development seem natural. It’s continuously positive but never feels forced, and the effortless jabs of cynicism from Harry’s character are put to rest by Ryan’s tactile countermeasures and vice versa. Not to mention a wonderful supporting act in the form of Carrie Fisher and Bruno Kirby. It’s a celebration of those long stories that build up to unforgettable romances, the type I think everyone wishes they could find.

Narrative Drama – 2/5

Originality – 3/5

Life Lessons – 3/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 1/5

Final Verdict: God I wish I could talk like Harry and Sally do. So open and interested in anything and everything. I don’t think any conversation I’ve ever had has flowed as well as theirs.

My Neighbor Totoro (1988)


Written & Directed by Hayao Miyazaki

I could have stuck any Studio Ghibli film on this list to be honest, but My Neighbor Totoro just about clinches it over Kiki’s Delivery Service, another Ghibli fantasy with no real threat or conflict. Rather than telling a traditional story, Totoro would rather leave you awash in the world of its friendly, desperately creative woodland spirits and how young sisters Satsuki and Mei react and interact with them. This lack of narrative cohesion may be off putting to some, but for many this allows the film to take on an ethereal quality akin to meditation or complete relaxation (depending on whether you find catbus disturbing or not, of course). Almost Ghibli’s entire back catalogue could have filled this list, but the timelessness of Totoro comes from its dreamlike capacity to simply string incoherent scenes together purely for the sake of spectacle or whimsy. It harkens back to an age where entertainment was simpler, and all that mattered was that you were able to whisk an audience away from their own lives and problems for a period of time. There’s very few who were better than Miyazaki at that.

Narrative Drama – 0/5

Originality – 4/5

Life Lessons – 2/5

Pain to Get to the Lesson – 0/5

Final Verdict: The screen-version of playing with stuffed animals for an hour and a half, but people at the supermarket won’t give you strange looks if you stick on My Neighbor Totoro so it’s win-win.

And that’s fifteen! This was fun. Obviously, there’s dozens more I could have included by I wanted this list to stand out from some of the other similar ones I’ve seen online (the shortlist I put together was 48 films long). Maybe I’ll suggest some other ones at a later date when the world continues to be a flaming hot mess. But until then, stay safe and let me know the films that make you feel better in times of despair. I think we could all use to great recommendations at a time like this.


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Of course, the reason I'm even making suggestions is because I know how important it is to remember to turn off every now and then. But it's important not to ignore the important issues. Whether it's the continuing protests in support of the #BlackLivesMatter campaign (Breonna Taylor for example still hasn't been given justice. Her murderers are walking free), the Yemen humanitarian crisis or even the efforts from the Trump administration in the US to pull back support for the LGBTQ+ community. There's sometimes too many to keep up to date on I know, but even if it's just 10 minutes a day, remember to stay up to date on one or two topics. Sign a couple of petitions. Post a link or retweet a video. Spread the word. 10 minutes a day adds up, and you can be proud in the fact that you didn't let such causes go by without trying something.



Here's an incredibly helpful (but no exhaustive) list of links to articles, petitions and videos on various causes and problems going on right now. It's a great place to start your 10 minutes.

https://dotherightthing.carrd.co/


Hope you all have a wonderful day.

Thank you for visiting and reading.

Remember, the pandemic isn't over. If you're able continue to, stay inside and stay safe.

See you next week.



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